What I Sell

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Did you ever realize that people might not even realize what business you’re in? Sometimes, we miss a post, or a tweet, or we haven’t caught up recently, and then pow, years pass, and we don’t really know what’s what.

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Self Worth

Half Again When something stinky happens, it’s hard not to feel almost immediately that it’s because you’re somehow bad or not worthy or something like that. Maybe I should speak for myself. When something bad happens to me, I tend to think it’s because I’m not worth it. But I was thinking about something and then it dawned on me. The solution is built into the phrase.

It’s called SELF worth for a reason

When someone acts in a certain way, and we react in a way as if we feel devalued, for unknown reasons, I think we somehow make it about our self-worth. We’re not good enough. I’m not good enough. Clearly. Or else, it would’ve gone a different way.

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Send Christmas Cards Whenever You Feel Like It

I just got done talking to friend and coworker, Ron Hood, and he said the most marvelous thing. He said that many times, in a conversation with a client or someone connected to our business, he’ll feel a nice connection with the person. He’ll say, “Oh, I’ll have to add you to my Christmas card list.” But that’s only the beginning. Ron Hood

Ron then sends the card a few days after he tells them this. It could be May. It could be July. And it’s a Christmas card, not a card. It’s whatever it is, a tree or Santa or Jesus. I don’t really know because I’m not on his list. Yet. :)

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Come see Rob Hatch and Me at the InfusionSoft Event in Denver

InfusionSoft Rob Hatch and I are headed to Denver to speak about Small Biz Big Things with our friends from InfusionSoft. We’re talking about The Business of Belonging: How I Built My Media Empire. It’s fun, because not only will we talk about the goals of the organization, but we’ll give a lot of behind-the-scenes information on how we were able to accomplish all we’ve managed to get done.

The way they talk about it on the site is that we were successful because of the tools. We agree. And also, we were successful because we learned how to nurture our community and build relationships that these tools allowed us to really communicate to people in a way that let them know we appreciated their connection, and that we wanted to ensure we were being as helpful as possible. to their goals.

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Stop Making Content Just to Make It

Listen, you’ve been told that “content is king.” Far too many times, I’d add. But it’s not the meal. It’s the condiment.Harold Brogan, Pizza King

You’ve been told to blog daily, or tweet ten times a day, or make four facebook updates, or whatever you’ve been told. How the hell do I know? But at this point, is it getting you anywhere? Are you getting more business by just throwing whatever you think of up onto the web?

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Play a Bigger Game

George Clooney

I’m on a train bound for meetings in New York City, with the types of people I rarely meet: investors. They work in an abstract that isn’t my typical play space, and they are tuned for completely different levels of thoughts, of insights, of metrics to prove their point. They play a bigger game.

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A Response is Marketing

Have you ever pushed a crosswalk button a thousand times because you’re in a hurry and you’re concerned it “didn’t take?” Today, in Toronto, I pushed a button and it lit up to tell me, “Hey, yes you did indeed push me.” Wow, I thought. A response. crosswalk light

Sometimes, I have email in my inbox from people who have sent me email a few days before. They’re pushing the same button. They’re saying, “I really hope you’ll respond soon.” I’m that black crosswalk button without a light to tell them they’ve been seen.

A Response is Marketing

One of humankind’s greatest needs is to feel wanted. An extension of that is the feeling that we need to be seen. From early childhood, we start this dance of “mama! Mama! Look at what I’m doing!” I feel we never really grow out of this.

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Presence Is Something You Could Build Now

I started my blog way back in 1998, when it was called journaling. I had no idea what to do with it. I started the way lots of people did back then: I wrote about whatever was on my mind, however trivial. Every media software I’ve used since then has been some mix of personal presence building plus an attempt to add some level of value to the larger story. Both are important. And there’s no great time to start. But there’s always a chance to be “too late.” Chris Brogan

Build Your Digital Presence Now

Start an account somewhere that lets you tell the story you want to tell, in the way you want to tell it. You like taking pictures and sharing them? I love Instagram for that. You want to make videos that show the behind-the-scenes of your great company? Maybe get a YouTube account. I’ve said this for years, and I’ll repeat it now. If I had to choose ONLY ONE digital online property, it’d be a self-hosted blog. Why? Because we “rent” all those other places, and even though we tend to rent server space, the rules of our hosting provider are usually far more in our favor than any social media software out there. (Related to this, my friend, John Saddington invented a photo sharing app and WordPress combo that lets you publish photos to your very own WordPress, if you didn’t feel like using Instagram or Flickr or the like.

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Are You Ready to Do?

I had the chance to review Kevin Kelly’s new book, DO! the pursuit of xceptional execution (aff link), and it’s really worth checking out. He’s got a lot of ideas that will help you, especially if you’re the kind that thinks about it but doesn’t always pull the trigger. do

Do you need a book about doing?

If the book tried to spend all its pages telling me “you’ve just gotta get started and do something,” I’d probably lose my mind about ten pages in, but Kelly has a lot packed in here. His chapter on being a student forever was a particular favorite, as was his mindset around customer relationships. The doing part of the book is a constant thread throughout, but there’s more meat to this than that.

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