Bravery is Contagious

Matt Ridings and Chris Brogan, shot by Kerry Gorgone I recently watched my friend, Matt Ridings give a very personal speech, wherein which he talked about culture and how culture is living content. It was mind-blowing especially insofar as how Matt told a very personal story and then a story everyone over twelve years old knows. In the process, though the speech itself was magical, I just kept thinking about the bravery Matt demonstrated in telling the tale the way he wanted to tell it.

Bravery is Contagious

Yesterday, I gave a speech at PubCon wherein which I decided to tell an audience of hardcore Internet marketers about the vital importance of mission. I sketched out the Ownership Principles we teach in courses like The Owner’s Heart and what we’ll cover at our live event in Boston. I did so by talking about three military battles, where the mission was much larger than the man, as my example of how this works.

Continue Reading

Building a Culture of High Performance Training

Chris Brogan In working through my new course, The Owner’s Heart, we had to understand what was required for an owner to have a successful journey from a life (and job) being led by others to picking up the capabilities and connections required to own your choices and your business as well. Just like it says here at [chrisbrogan.com], “you can’t own your business, until you own your life,” I knew that I had to explain how one moves from that sense that you’re not quite making it to that deeply-felt knowledge that you’re on the path towards what you want to accomplish. Today, I was thinking through what this looks like inside an organization, however small or large. What does it take to build a high performance training culture?

What does an Owner’s training culture look like?

Owners know that training is as important as eating and sleeping. You don’t just finish learning something and call it good. Training is more of an ongoing process, a discipline, a way to keep your skills and your knowledge alive. Training is daily.

Continue Reading

Work Life Balance?

Work Ethic I just finished watching a documentary on Paul Levesque, better known as Triple H, a professional wrestler, now helping shape the WWE and sports entertainment. In it, the recurring theme was that Paul had a very strong work ethic, that he pushed harder, worked harder, did more than those around him. His intense level of dedication to his work brought him the success that he earned throughout his career.

Lots of people argue that it’s difficult to reach those levels and still have a life or a family. Anyone who works hard is often cautioned that it will ruin your relationship, that you’ll never get to see your kids, that you can’t have a thriving career and still have a life worth living.

Continue Reading

What I’ve Come to Learn About Learning

Blogging Webinar I’ve come to learn that I’m somewhat different than other people when it comes to learning. I’m there for the candy bar, not the wrapper. And yet, I understand it, after the fact. Let me explain.

People Want Their Learning to LOOK Very Formal

In my experience, I find that the best lessons I’ve ever learned came during “between official moments” experiences, after hours, in the back rooms, quietly over coffee somewhere, or in other very informal places. When we talk openly versus with all the polish is where the best lessons come, OR SO I BELIEVE MYSELF.

Continue Reading

My Take on Inbound Marketing

Spartan Trifecta Reebok I’m presenting at Hubspot’s Inbound conference today, which marks my second time there with about six years distance in between. Has anything changed? No. Yes. But it would depend who you ask. There have been some really smart posts about the future of inbound marketing. I want to give you a simpler take than all that.

The Value of Inbound Marketing

Jacqueline and I completed our first Spartan race in August of 2014. Note that I say “first.” This is your first clue that the organization is doing something right. My friend, Chad, just completed what’s called a double trifecta. This means that Chad has raced the three main Spartan race distances (sprint, super, and beast) and completed those races twice. The Reebok sneakers at the top of this post? Those are only sold to people who have completed the Trifecta. You can’t even buy them without proof that you’re a pretty badass obstacle course runner.

Continue Reading

Find Intensity

I Command You to Grow I’ll admit it. I’m obsessed at the moment with this video with CT Fletcher, Kai Greene, and Dana Linn Bailey. (NOTE: this video is FULL of curse words, so if you’re a bit sensitive to such, do not push play). I’m obsessed for a reason. I’m thinking a lot about intensity.

The Vast Distance Between “Doing” and Intensity

I’ve been working on my fitness for a while. Those of you who follow me on Instagram have been subjected to my sweaty selfies for years. But two major changes have happened back to back, and in them, I’ve found a lesson (two!) to share with you.

Continue Reading

Get Some Chris Guillebeau

The Happiness of Pursuit There are few people who I think have the opportunity to start and maintain a cult. Chris Guillebeau is one of them. He’s so lovable, so damned addictive, and his ideas are YOUR ideas. He gives them to you and hopes you’ll do what he did: work and make them real.

Pick up this book by Chris Guillebeau – The Happiness of Pursuit: Finding the Quest That Will Bring Purpose to Your Life. The deal is this. You’ve got to read the book, but you have to DO something with it. Oh, and here’s my interview with him:

Continue Reading

How to Blog for Business

Chris Brogan Writing posts on this blog has been a cornerstone of my business for quite a while now. I started blogging in 1998 (we called it “journaling” back then), but it wasn’t really until somewhere around 2005 that I started figuring out how it would be part of my actual business (and by that, how it would be a way to make money).

How to Blog for Business

There are so many ways to look at this. You can choose to think of your blog as a media company, and stuff ads on it. I love ads, well, ads for things that make sense. The sidebar at [chrisbrogan.com] is full of companies I strongly support. Some people think just putting any old ad on their site will work. Or Adsense. (And it does, for SOME sites. Especially if you have 500,000 monthly unique visitors, which I don’t. I have only 200,000 or so.)

Continue Reading

Build Your Home

Chris Brogan It all started making sense a little bit at a time, and then a lot at a time, and then I really saw it all, in a kind of continuum. By spending a lot of time analyzing what people have said to me at various events, in my inbox, in between their “official” statements and professional posturing, I’m starting to understand what’s needed by the Owners I so humbly intend to serve. There’s a war, such as it were, and the enemy has been named. But before we talk of war, we have to start where it always starts: at home.

Build Your Home

Life has changed over the last few decades. The promises that were handed to the Baby Boomer generation were as such: do good work, be loyal, show up, and everything else will be handled. We told their parents to serve their country and then come back and buy a house. The American Dream was one of the greatest marketing events to ever face the western world, and we exported it, too, so that people who were perfectly happy overseas could suddenly feel inadequate as well. If you weren’t following the American Dream mindset and model, what the heck were you doing? Certainly not living.

Continue Reading

The Front Shop and the Back Room

Storefront If you look at chrisbrogan.com, it’s built for conversion. There are my courses for sale, other projects, and then some of the free resources (which are also built to convert you). This is the front shop. This is where people stop by. They get here via Google (The #1 search term lately for people finding this site is “Chris.” Talk about people not being especially picky with their time.” It’s up to me to help them understand the better story so they can choose what to do next.

But that’s the “front shop,” where anyone can browse. Once people get my newsletter, they’ve been invited to the “back room,” where you don’t necessarily have to buy, but where the stories are better, the information is a bit more free-flowing, and the opportunities to connect with others is better still. That big difference, between the front shop and the back room, is a missing element for lots of folks.

Continue Reading